Archives for Skyline


Nissan Skylines at the Autosport International Show 2014

Nissan GTR

Nissan GTR’s at the Autosport International show at the NEC.

Tuned cars at the Autosport International show 2014

Tuned Cars

Tuned cars at the Autosport International show at the NEC. 

Ford, Lotus, Nissan and Subaru to name a few.

Nissan Skyline R34 GT-R

Nissan_Skyline_R34_GT-R_Nur_5thgenThe most gorgeous of all the Skylines especially in the Bayside Blue colour, with huge tuning potential, my favourite of all the Skylines.

In May 1998, after sales of the Nissan Skyline plummeted from the release of the R33 chassis the EN34, HR34, ER34 and BNR34 addressed many of the concerns over the change from the R33, with more emphasis on sportiness, and marked the introduction of the more fuel-efficient and environmentally-friendly RB25DET NEO engine. Also the front end was re-arranged from the R33 unattractive front end and was aimed more towards the R32 style to draw people back into the “skyline world” . The RB20E engine was discontinued in the R34 base model (GT), and the RB20DE, after last being used in the R32 Skyline, was reintroduced in updated NEO guise. The R34 GT powered by the RB20DE NEO, coupled with a 5-speed gearbox, became the most fuel-efficient straight-6 Skyline to date (of any shape). Carlos Ghosn stated on the release date of the Nissan Skyline R34 that “We hope to win people back with the old school design based around the R32 shell, due to the initial complaints corresponded with the R33 chasis and body” The 5-speed automatic transmission available on some models in the previous two shapes were discontinued. In its place, Nissan produced a 4-speed Tiptronic transmission for all of the automatic versions (Except the base 2.0L, which has a standard 5 speed gearbox). Only the GT-T coupe variant was sold in New Zealand from 2000 and it was the only country besides Japan that sold the R34 GT-T model Skylines new. The GT-T models were rebadged as Infiniti G25t for export markets.

GT-R
The GT-R reappeared in 1999, with a revised chassis and other updates. The R34 turbos received a ball bearing core. The R34 N1 turbos had a metal exhaust wheel, and ball bearing center section. A 6-speed Getrag gearbox was used. The turbo outlet pipes were changed from cast to formed metal outlets. The intercooler outlet side and rear turbo dump pipe had temperature probes fitted in the V-spec models.

Nissan Skyline R33 GT-R

Nissan_Skyline_R33_GT-R_4thgen

Give me a V-Spec II of these and I’ll be a happy bunny.

R33
The R33 Skyline was introduced in August 1993. Slightly heavier than the R32, it is available in coupe and sedan bodystyles. All models now used a 6-cylinder engine. Nissan took the unusual step of down-grading the GTS model to have only the RB20E, while the twin-cam of the R32 GTS was discontinued along with the 2.0 L turbo RB20DET.

Some models came equipped with a new version of the HICAS 4-wheel steering system called Super HICAS. This computer controlled system was first used on the R32 GT-R. Super HICAS used electric actuators to steer the rear, as opposed to the hydraulic HICAS. This generation was no longer considered a “compact” under Japanese legislation that determined the amount of tax liability based on exterior dimensions.

As an option, an active limited slip differential was available instead of the standard viscous LSD. This new unit locked the rear differential if it detected that traction was lost by one of the wheels. A light on the dash also lit up if the LSD engaged. Active LSD came standard on all V-Spec R33 GT-R Skylines and was also available on some ECR33 GTS-25t models; these can be identified by the A-LSD and SLIP lights on the tachometer.

The RB25DE and RB25DET engines also became equipped with NVCS (variable inlet cam phasing). NVCS equipped RB’s have a bulge on the front of the cam cover. To celebrate their 40th anniversary, Nissan introduced a very rare 4 door GT-R. Two versions of the 4-door GT-R were available from Nissan’s subsidiaries: the first was produced by Autech, and the second was a joint Autech/Nismo project.

An R33 based wagon was released in September 1996, called the Stagea. It had a different body style than the R33 and R34 and (with the exception of the RS FOUR & Autech variants) was only available with an automatic transmission. A common modification on the Stagea is to fit it with an R34 skyline front, in effect making a 4 door R34 wagon. The Stagea is the only four wheel drive manual transmission Nissan on the R33 platform with the RB25DET engine. Presumably, a 5-speed 4WD Skyline equipped with an RB25DET would have been too close in performance to the much more expensive GT-R. There was also an Autech Stagea, the 260RS released with full GT-R running gear, the RB26DETT engine, body kit, 17″ BBS style alloys, GT-R instrumentation, and manual transmission.

GT-R
The BCNR33 GT-R version also had the same RB26DETT engine that the BNR32 was equipped with, although torque had been improved, due to changes in the turbo compressor aerodynamics, turbo dump pipe, and intercooler. The turbo core changed from a sleeve bearing to a ball bearing, but the turbine itself remained ceramic, except on N1 turbos (steel turbine, sleeve bearing). From the R33 onward, all GT-Rs received Brembo brakes. In 1995 the GT-R received an improved version of the RB26DETT, the ATTESA-ETS four wheel drive system, and Super HICAS 4-wheel steering.

A limited edition model was created in 1996, called the NISMO 400R, that produced 400 hp (298 kW) from a road-tuned version of Nissan’s Le Mans engine. A stronger six-speed Getrag gearbox was used.

An R33 GT-R driven by Dirk Schoysman lapped the Nordschleife in less than 8 minutes. Though it was often said to be the first production car to break 8 minutes, the limited run Jaguar XJ220 had already achieved a 7’46” lap. Other manufacturers had caught up since the R32 was released, and the R33 never dominated motorsport to the extent of the R32.

Michael Begley with the Gaijin R33 GT-R currently holds the European four wheel drive 1/4 mile record with a time of 8.06 @ 173 mph. This record was set at Santa Pod raceway in England. Gaijin (“the outsider”) is tuned by TR Racing in Harlow Essex UK. This R33 GT-R is said to have had in the region of 1400 bhp. The owner Mick Begley lives in the UK and is reportedly chasing a 7 second pass. The four wheel drive 1/4 mile world record was set by Reece McGregor from New Zealand in the Heat Treatments R32 GT-R, setting a best time of 7:54 @ 197 mph, overtaking the haloed HKS R33 GT-R.

In August 2010, Elitetech Automotive (based near Silverstone, UK) launched a low volume production run of the R33 GT-R but in LHD (left hand drive) format. First deliveries will be made in early 2011, with vehicles being sold to Europe and further afield. All standard equipment remains on the specification list of the zero compromise LHD version.

Nissan Skyline R32 GT-R

Nissan_Skyline_R32_GT-R_3rdgenThe monster from Japan.! I own a R34 and have wanted one for ages, however, the more I see the R32 the more it grows on me, I think it looks great in this grey but if it was to be perfect it would need the R34 ass on it.! For what this car achieved back in the 80’s it has to be called a supercar.

R32
The R32 Skyline debuted in May 1989. It was available as either a 2-door coupe or 4-door hardtop sedan, all other bodystyles were dropped. The R32 featured several versions of the RB-series straight-6 engines, which had improved heads (the twelve port inlet was gone) and used the ECCS (Electronically Concentrated Control System) injection system. Also available was an 1,800 cc 4 cylinder GXi model. Most models had HICAS four-wheel steering, with the rear wheels being hydraulically linked to the front steering. The 2.5 litre GTS-25 became one of the first Japanese production cars to feature a 5-speed automatic transmission. The GTS-t came in standard and Type M configurations, with the Type M having larger five-stud 16 inch wheels, four piston front callipers and twin piston rears plus other minor differences. ABS was optional (except for the GT-R and GTS-4), mechanical LSD was standard on the GTR and viscous LSD was standard on all turbo models and optional on all but the GXi. Nissan also produced 100 Australian models of the R32. There was also a 4WD version of the GTS-t Type M, called the GTS-4.

GT-R
The GT-R returned with twin ceramic turbochargers, all-wheel steering, electronically controlled four wheel drive, and 276 hp at 6800 rpm. The RB26DETT engine actually produced ~320 hp, but it was unstated due to the Japanese car makers’ “gentlemen’s agreement” not to exceed 276 hp. The engine was designed for ~500 hp in racing trim, and then muzzled by the exhaust, boost restriction, and ECU. The electronic boost control had a small physical restriction in the control lines. It was marked in yellow so the new owner could remove it and enjoy a safe factory boost increase. After this increase the car would put out ~310 hp and could do 0–100 km/h in 4.7seconds and quarter mile in 12.8 seconds.

The GT-R had a significantly larger intercooler, larger brakes, and aluminium front guards and bonnet. Other distinguishing features include flared front and rear wheel arches. More supportive seats were fitted, and the turbo boost gauge and digital clock were removed from inside the instrument cluster. The clock was replaced with a torque meter that indicated how much torque was being delivered to the front wheels (0%–50%). Oil temp, voltage, and turbo boost gauges were fitted just above the climate control.
The Porsche 959 was Nissan’s target when designing the GT-R. The chief engineer, Naganori Itoh, intended to use the car for Group A racing, so the design specification was drawn up in conjunction with a copy of the Group A rules. The Nordschleife production car record at the time of development was 8’45” – set by a Porsche 944. Nissan test driver Hiroyoshi Katoh reset the record with a time of 8’20”.

The R32 GT-R dominated Japanese Touring Car Championship (JTCC), winning 29 races from 29 starts, taking the series title every year from 1989 to 1993. It took 50 races from 50 starts from 1991 to 1997 (latterly R33) in the N1 Super Taikyu.

The R32 GT-R was introduced in to the Australian Touring Car Championship in 1990 and promptly ended the reign of the previously all-conquering Ford Sierra Cosworth, winning Bathurst 1000 classic in 1991 and 1992. This success led to the Australian motoring press nicknaming the car Godzilla due to it being a “monster from Japan”. As Australia was the first export market for the car the name quickly spread. Such was GT-R’s dominance that it was a significant factor in the demise of Group A Touring Car racing, the formula being scrapped soon after. JTCC was similarly blighted by the R32 GT-R, and splintered soon after, leading to the switch to the Supertouring category and also indirectly to the GT500 category of today.

When originally designed, the homologation rulebook mandated 16-inch wheels, so that’s what the GT-R got. This limited the size of the brakes, and the Nissan four pots weren’t really up to competition use. A later change in rules allowed 17-inch wheels, so in February 1993 the GT-R V-spec (for Victory) emerged wearing 17″ BBS mesh wheels(225/50/17) covering larger Brembo brakes. The clutch actuation changed from a push to a pull system, the car had the standard rear differential, the electronic rear differential did not show up until the R33 Vspec. A year later the V-Spec II appeared with a new sticker and wider tires(245/45/17).

Nissan GT-R

Nissan-GT-R-2012The Nissan GT-R is personally one of my most favourite cars. If I held the winning lottery ticket it would be the first car I would buy, which I would drive to the Aventador garage.! Having owned Nissan 200sx (S13) and now my Skyline R34 I definitely have a soft spot for these iconic Japanese cars.
The 2013 GT-R has a 3.8 litre twin turbocharged V6 engine that produces 550PS@6400rpm.

Nissan chief creative officer, Shirō Nakamura, has likened the new GT-R to the giant robots of the Gundam series.Nakamura stated: “The GT-R is unique because it is not simply a copy of a European-designed supercar; it had to really reflect Japanese culture.”
Nissan’s American designers sculpted the rear three quarters of the vehicle, while their European designers sculpted the roofline.
Polyphony Digital, creators of the Gran Turismo series of motor racing video games, were themselves involved in the development of the GT-R, having been contracted to design the GT-R’s multifunction display.
The Nissan GT-R’s body construction uses Nissan’s Premium Midship (PM) platform with hybrid unibody assembled using high-precision, ultra-low-tolerance jigs similar to racecar construction. Aluminum is used for the hood, trunk lid and outer door skins, with die-cast aluminum front shock towers and inner door structures. All outer body panels stamped using multiple-strike coining process for added rigidity and precision. The GT-R also has a Carbon-composite front crossmember/radiator support. Its paint is an advanced 6-stage paint process with double clear coat and chip-resistant paint in critical areas. An optional color is Super Silver special metallic paint, with 8-stage process, including three cleacoats and hand-polishing to achieve a lustrous, liquid effect. The Premium Nissan GT-R has a body-colored rear spoiler whereas the Black Edition has a dry carbon-fiber rear spoiler. Both the Premium and Black Edition GT-R are fitted with high intensity discharge (HID) headlights, automatic on/off headlights, LED daytime running lights, LED taillights and brake lights, dual heated body-color power outside mirrors, power folding outside mirrors, flush-mounted aluminum door handles, four 5″ exhaust outlets with polished tips and UV-reducing solar glass.
For the 2014 model year, Nissan introduced a limited production Track Edition GT-R, which gets all the same features as the Black Edition, but adds a more aggressive suspension, carbon fiber air inlets, better brake cooling, a unique front spoiler, and new black and gray leather Recaro front seats. Nissan have also removed the rear seats, saving 22 lbs over the Black Edition.
The Nissan GT-R is powered by the VR38DETT V6 engine, a 3,799 cc (3.8 L; 231.8 cu in) DOHC V6 with plasma transferred wire arc sprayed cylinder bores.  Two parallel Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries (IHI) turbochargers provide forced induction. Models manufactured between 2007 and 2010 produce a manufacturer-claimed engine output of 485 hp at 6400 rpm and 434 lb·ft at 3200–5200 rpm. The engine also meets California Air Resources Board Ultra Low Emsission Vehicle (ULEV) standards. A curb weight of 1,730 kg (3,810 lb) or 1,736 kg (3,827 lb) with side curtain airbags is achieved using a jig welded steel chassis with aluminum used for the hood, trunk, and doors. A rear mounted six-speed BorgWarner designed dual clutch semi-automatic transmission built by Aichi Machine Industryis used in conjunction with the Attesa E-TS system to provide power to all four wheels and along with Nissan’s Vehicle Dynamics Control (VDC-R) to aid in stability. Three shift modes can also be selected for various conditions. Beginning in 2010, engine power and torque were upgraded to 523 hp at 6400 rpm and 451 lb-ft at 3200–6000 rpm respectively. Models produced in 2012 again featured improved engine output 542 hp at at 6400 rpm and 463lb-ft at 3200–5800 rpm). In the near future, it is speculated that the GT-R might even be available as a hybrid.

2012 Facelift
The revised GT-R features an engine with revised mapping, changes to valve timing, larger inlets and a revised exhaust system which boosts rated power to 530 bhpand 612Nm of torque from 3200 to 6000rpm. Changes also include a new more rigid front strut bar made from carbon composite, larger front brake rotors, new lighter and stiffer wheels, and revised Dunlop tires. Cosmetic changes include a new front bumper with integrated LEDs. The front bumper improves cooling to the radiator and front brakes while reducing drag. A new rear diffuser improves downforce and also includes additional rear cooling ducts. The interior was revised to improve the quality. The revised GT-R went on sale in Japan from mid November 2010 and February 2011 in Europe, North America and other regions.

Spec-V
Nissan introduced the GT-R SpecV on January 7, 2009 at the 2009 Tokyo Auto Salon. Exterior changes from the base GT-R consist of a carbon fiber rear spoiler, grille, and brake ducts, along with an exclusive Ultimate Black Opal paint job. Interior changes include a set of carbon fiber Recaro front seats with the rear seats being completely removed. Carbon fiber covers the center storage box, instrument panel, and replaces the majority of the interior trim.
The GT-R SpecV is powered by the standard twin-turbo 3,799 cc (3.8 L; 231.8 cu in) V6 with no increase in horsepower. A new high gear boost controller that allows a temporary increase in boost pressure to the IHI twin turbochargers, now larger than those on the standard GT-R, should deliver more torque in mid to high-range revs. Other mechanical changes include a titanium exhaust, reworked suspension, carbon ceramic brakes, and 20-inch (510 mm) Nismo wheels. Overall weight is decreased by 60 kg over the standard GT-R.

Performance
Nissan claims the GT-R can reach a top speed of 193 mph. In tests the original production model was shown to be capable of achieving 0-60 mph times as low as 3.2 seconds using “launch control.”